Neuro-Kinesiology

Neuro-Kinesiology

 Neuro-Kinesiology, relieving the stress and trauma of yesterday and today for the essential health of tomorrow. Neuro-Kinesiology is a derivative of many years of study and mapping of the neuro, cell and mind memory. Using muscle testing and cell language to track, retrieve and integrate information. This practice is being used to relieve chronic muscle and structural disorders as well as emotional disorders. In addition, it is an effective means of redefining ancestral cellular memory. NK has not only been used to reduce chronic and mild trauma, but has also received acclaimed recognition for infusing positive reinforcement for one’s personal achievement decisions. Dr. Loren Hunter worked closely with Dr. Alan Beardall, the founder of clinical kinesiology. As the founder of neuro-kinesiology as a healing modality, Dr. Hunter has worked effectively with many disorders and ailments by reinitiating pathways in the brain. Dr. Bernard Spilman has written an outstanding article on the fundamentals of neuro-kinesiology, so we have provided it below as an explanation of the work. Modern man is the end product of a long evolutionary process that lasted millions of years. The structural changes which may be observed after thousands and even millions of years are the consequences or responses of living creatures to external stimulations; in other words, this is adaptation. Living creatures do not evolve because they want to but because they have to. Modern man is perhaps the best example. He is the product of a continuity of successful adjustments over the past five to ten million years. Among all the groups of pre-humans since the Australopithecine, only one, the Homo sapiens sapiens has succeeded in surviving. Perhaps one of the major reasons why he succeeded whereas others failed is that he was the only one who became a full contralateral biped, with all of its physical advantages. The strategy for human adjustability is also better than that of any other primate because the length of infancy is the longest. The human brain continues to grow at a fetal rate for six years after birth. In comparison, the brain of a chimpanzee reaches final cranial capacity three years after birth, while that of the orangutan three and a half years after birth and that of the macaque eighteen months. Feeding, reproduction, and the defense mechanism are the components of survival. All three are essential to the survival of both the individual and the species. Integral to the defense mechanism of the individual is the sensory system whose main function is to send, every second of our lives, thousands of messages to the brain, some reaching the conscious level, but most of them only being analyzed subconsciously but nevertheless informing us of our surrounding environment. Any change which may occur will immediately be analyzed as a threatening or non-threatening situation so as to enable the body to respond accordingly so as to preserve its physical and mental integrity. We may therefore conclude that the sensory system has enabled us to adjust to the constraints of the surrounding media over the course of the millennia and to evolve to the point where bony structures have been modified as well as additional pathways created in the central nervous system. More precisely, the position, volume, insertion, and origin of muscles have changed during this lengthy period of time, and several modifications of organs have also undoubtedly taken place. In health as in disease, the same fundamental principle exists, namely, that the body responds in its dynamic and structural arrangement to a number of ancestral rules. We can say that a person is healthy when all his or her organs, muscles, and joints are functioning in harmony with one another. On the other hand, if an organ, muscle or joint is traumatized, it may produce a chain reaction which in the long run could spread to other organs, muscles, and joints. Health practitioners can no longer treat their patients with symptomatic and palliative medicine. Unfortunately, to many a physician, a pain in the elbow is too often diagnosed as a tennis elbow, when in fact, it could very well be the product of a thyroid or a gall bladder imbalance. A throat infection is too frequently diagnosed as laryngitis, when, in reality, the problem may originate in the prostate or the urethra. Similarly, a trauma to the knee joint may degenerate after several years into osteoarthritis of the cervico-thoracic spine, while migraine headaches may be the result of a chronic digestive disorder or a hormonal imbalance. The list is endless. The scope of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures should open up and extend beyond local findings. But this will only be feasible if health practitioners gain a better understanding of the organic, structural, and mental interconnections which regulate the human body. Physical examinations, laboratory work, X-rays, etc. are certainly all helpful screening tools, but they are unfortunately too often employed as an end in themselves. There is too frequently a gap between the symptoms and the findings. NeuroKinesiology, which is the product of years of clinical research and practical experience, will be a first step in filling this gap for the benefit of all patients and will induce further study into this generally neglected aspect of human medicine. By Dr. Bernard Spilman, DC at www.neurokinesiology.org