Nutrition Counseling

Nutrition Counseling

 Good health is available to everyone! Not just to the affluent. Not just to the well-educated. Not just to the well insured. Everyone! Health is in the individual, not in pills, surgery, or “medicine”. In 1986, the people of the United States spent over $458 billion on health care. That is 10.9 percent of our gross national product, which averages out to approximately $1,837 for every man, woman, and child in the country. Cardiovascular disease alone accounted for over 88 billion health-care dollars in 1989. You would think that with that much money being dedicated to health we would be a nation of robust, energetic, vibrant individuals. But are we? Apparently not. Each year we spend more and more trying to fix body parts that have gone wrong. We are a nation obsessed with illness. When two or more are gathered together in a social setting, the conversation turns into a friendly scrimmage of symptom one-upmanship. Who had the highest fever during the last bout of flu? How strong was the medicine the doctor prescribed? Who was “down and out” the longest? What are the odds against full recovery or the chances of long-term repercussions? From insomnia to arthritis or allergies to viruses, misery has become something of a status symbol. We seem to take perverse pleasure in seeing how un-well we can make ourselves without slipping over the edge to self-destruction. This is backwards! Where is it written that illness is mandatory? In contradiction to our attitude that illness is a normal part of life, a society exists where the people not only survive to be over one hundred years old; they live mentally and physically active lives well past the century mark. The people of Hunza, hidden away in the Himalayas, are living testaments to the concept that health is a natural state of life. In this small, remote, independent state of Pakistan, there are no doctors, infant mortality is “virtually nonexistent” there are no childhood diseases or ulcers, and ninety-year-old men father children. For recreation, volleyball games pit the “youngsters” of 16 to 50 against the “elders” who are over 70 and as old as 145. There are no crimes, jails, police, taxes, or banks, and essentially no divorces. The people live long, happy, satisfying, productive lives in harmony with themselves, each other, and their environment. They enjoy life and health.  What does this apparently idyllic society have to do with our fast-paced, ultra-modern, high-tech way of life? It illustrates that the human body will function well for decades longer than we give it credit for if we provide it the proper exercise, serenity, diet and environment. The primary personal responsibility of each of us is to promote our own health, not merely fight disease. We cannot do our best for ourselves, our families, communities, or society if we are constantly waging a no-win war against the symptoms of illness. Medicine can’t heal. Drugs can’t heal. Chiropractic can’t heal. Only the body can heal. We can’t do any more for the body than the body can do for itself. Over a decade ago, Dr. Beverly Winikoff of the Rockefeller Foundation in New York advised a Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the fallacy of depending upon medicine to cure our individual or collective illness. The published report quotes Dr. Winikoff: There is a widespread and unfounded confidence in the ability of medical science to cure or mitigate the effects of such (nutrition-related) diseases once they occur. Appropriate public education must emphasize the unfortunate but clear limitations of current medical practice in curing the common killing diseases. Once hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis of heart disease are manifest, there is, in reality, very little that medical science can do to return a patient to normal physiological function. Your body will always do everything it can to continue to function. It recognizes the things that aren’t right: areas that aren’t demonstrating the perfection with which the body was created. Given the opportunity, the body will immediately start to repair injured or impaired areas. The critical stipulation is that it must be given the opportunity. Obviously, continuing activities, habits and the lifestyle that brought about the distress isn’t giving the body an opportunity to do anything differently. I don’t treat disease. I don’t cure anybody of anything. The body does the curing. For example, a patient came to me after being told by a doctor that she had a serious blood disease and could expect to live only another three months. She decided to give her body a chance to respond to different foods and a different lifestyle than those she had previously inflicted upon it. That was two years ago, and she still drops in to see me on occasion. Another patient came to me after he had been told by his doctor that he had about thirty days to live. That was nine years ago; I didn’t cure him. He did what he needed to do to reverse the effect of the things he had been doing wrong. That’s why he is still around. I don’t believe there is any disease you can’t get over, as long as you understand the law of miracles. I once saw a sign that succinctly expresses my attitude: “I don’t BELIEVE in miracles: I DEPEND on them.” My purpose is to offer an adjunct to current health care practices. No one should, on the basis of the information they receive here, discontinue medications or treatments prescribed by a licensed health practitioner. The medical community provides vital life-saving procedures for patients in acute distress. The concepts I offer are in no way intended to discount the importance and need for conventional medical treatment. Crisis intervention is often the only means of returning to a state where you can begin to take stock of your health situation and determine that something you were doing just wasn’t giving you the outcome you wanted. By understanding how the systems of the body work together, you will be in a better position to build a firm foundation of good health. The people of the tiny kingdom of Hunza have shown that we can live long, comfortable, energetic, productive lives. The attitude that aging is a “disease” is contrary to the design of life. Daily living need not be an exercise in progressive deterioration. No matter what your health status or age is right now, you can began to take steps that will give your body that crucial opportunity to begin to heal itself. We all know we have a finite life span. Yet we have accepted that everything goes down hill after thirty. Your body is equipped to replenish and repair itself until it stops functioning altogether. You can give your body the golden opportunity to continue to get better whether you are currently in your “youthful” years, your “middle” years, or your “golden” years. You have control over your health. I’m here to guide you on a trip to wellness. Only you can decide to make the journey. From Fell's Official Know-It-All Guide... Health and Wellness By Dr. M. Ted Mortar, Jr, MA